Is Private Education in Africa the Solution to Failing Education Aid?

Danish Faruqui, Sudeep Laad, Mary Abdo, Priyanka Thapar , Stanford Social Innovation Review, Dec 05, 2017
Commentary by Stephen Downes
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The answer the author provides is "yes". But the actual answer is, of course, "no". Let me explain how private education offers a "solution": it charges fees to prospective students. This means that it avoids the messy need to teach the really poor; it teaches those who can afford to pay. Read this article and tell me that this isn't what they're proposing! But this is no solution at all! For one thing, those who actually receive an education pay more than they would have otherwise. But worse, a large number of people receive no education at all, perpetuating the economic issues that have kept the country from progressing. Even worse, this article suggests that this is the approach charities should be taking. Let there be no mistake: societies progress as a whole, not by privileging an elite.

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