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What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

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Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

Useful and interesting ideas Mr. Downes - thank you! Our viewpoint and efforts are working on "Learning Systems Design" ("LSD" - usually gets attention). LSD is a "broader view of learning and teaching," and, we believe, adds new values and practices to "Instructional Systems Design - ISD" and its close cousin "curriculum design." Thank you for providing MUCH to think about in your work on "eLearning 2.0." Keep us posted please. Best - Dick Webster Richard S. Webster, Ph.D. - President, PRM Institute Worthington OH 43085-3558 eMail , tel 614-433-7144 * The Institute is a non-profit R&D enterprise (501-c-3) founded in 1978. ** PRMI works on learning systems design (LSD), learning quality assessment (LQA) and ideas processes. *** "Change is not required, survival is not mandatory" (Dr. W. Edwards Deming--quality guru, 1900-1993). **** Ideas ARE the start of it all - for learning, creativity, innovation, constructive change and continual improvement. -30- [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

give more details about what e-learning means at the base as u'r introduction.thank u. [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

FYI, here are user evaluation results for my paper and the other papers at the OCRI presentation: http://www.zoomerang.com/reports/public_report.zgi?ID=L22F5BAQLJQ5. [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

Listened to your podcasts while working through the day. Interesting line of thought. I must admit that I would query the 'effectiveness' of many e-Learning standards to the vast majority of learners who learn in different ways, at different times and with a range of different needs. I would also agree that much 'assessment' does not really support the creation of effective learning models - how often have I seen a VLE embraced because it provides an easy vehicle for 'assessing' through a range of 'multiple-guess' type assessments. However, I think we need to do more to demonstrate improved learning outcomes through new ways of working. It's not good enough just to say that the old ways of working do not work. We need to exemplify and use the new models of learning and assessment that are made available through new technologies. Especially the use of a broad e-Portfolio as part of an assessment for learning framework to shift both the power and responsibility for improved learning away from the teacher and into the hands of the learner and their family members. Andrew Flowerdew Learning Architect Innovicity PO Box 375 Market Drayton Shropshire England TF9 9AF Tel: +44 (0)797 000 9890 Skype: Andrew_Flowerdew e-mail: andrew@innovicity.com Web: www.innovicity.com [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

Stephen: I listened to the recording, rolled the slides along at the same time. My work is in "the private sector" and I thought you did a very good job of introducing your audience to what may have been to them a totally alien concept. Personally, I thought it was brilliant. The "problem" isn't references to "Wittgenstein, Quine, van Fraassen, Hanson, Lakoff, Stalneker and Lewis" -- we aren't totally ignorant out here in business. The problem, I think, in part is just that you live in an environment where "Web 2.0" (and all that it implies) is coming to life, and perhaps your audience does not "get it" this week. Unfortunately, it seems the norm in the world (private enterprise, government, and academia) is still to think of education as pouring knowledge into the heads of learners from pitchers guarded and maintained by the all-powerful, all-knowing Wizards (of Oz?). The idea of different "views" or resources available through a technologically mediated social network is one that can make people who want "the one right answer per omnia saecula saeculorum" very uneasy. We seem to be in an age in which individuals increasingly demand unambiguous and canonical answers from trusted authority, even though our situation demands insightful problem solving, coupled with the ability to carry on an intelligent conversation and the courage to make mistakes and learn from them. We might be at this for a while, you know. Keep talking to people. We'll figure it out eventually. Bill Brandon [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

An interesting paper available online in AACE Digital Library outlines a practical experiment along the lines of Stephens theme...not all the way there but on the way...and that is how one should look at presentations like this...perhaps Stephen you need to add some of the microsteps already being taken along this journey to help bring your audience with you and focus less on the theoretical foundations. This paper is entitled The Blog and the Borg: A Collective Approach to e-Learning. [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

Stephen: This graphic on conferences supports the three views that you discuss at the beginning of your presentation: http://blog.mathemagenic.com/2005/09/07.html Cheers; Harold Jarche [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

hello margaret, I would think one has to pay for all these gadgets as well? Plus perhaps phone bills? A PC? an internet connection and monthly bills? I am sure they are not all free? Therefore shall we say it is 'physical' vs 'virtual' payment for travelling distance? I think we are all sensible people to understand online distance learning is useful for some, but not necessary for all occassions. Furthermore, to want to have effective ODL, trainers and teachers have to be taught how to teach online effectively, or policies have to change to allow less students per teacher to make learning/teaching online same-as classroom. All these mean investment money for training and cost for time. Where do one think the money would come from??? From tuition. Money has to come from somewhere. Just depends on where. Driving 50, or 60 miles ... is jsut to indicate how much I would be willing to pay for just to be in the classroom and spend time CONCENTRATE on learning and not having to deal with all the 'extra' things I must know before I can learn what I WANT to learn. Most don't have to drive 50 or 60 miles. I am sure. And many people are smarter than I am when dealing with gadgets I am sure. To be sure, I am not anti-ODL. I just think we are being pushed along by marketing and sales of technology (since early 90s). Now we are stuck, and we have to deal with more marketing and sales of technology to compensate something that just don't work well. Cindy [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

Well, I hope you have enough money to pay for the gas to drive 50, 60, miles. What if we are training the trainer in a rural area and the learner is unable to drive to the classroom? Due to a lack of a car or money. Margaret [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

I think that is the whole point ... not everyone is moving along with the same pace. I am one of the slow ones. I too have problem with all the new tools such as podcasting, RSS feed... Sometime I wonder why we need all these tools if not to simulate what it is like face-to-face? If we need all these tools to make learning the same as in the classroom (podcast, blog, wiki etc. etc. ) why don't we jsut go back to classroom teaching/learning again? Here is what I imagine the new way of online distance learning -- have my ears plug to podcasting to listen, my eyes on powerpoint to read, my hands on blog/wiki to take notes ... If I could (distance wise), I would have NO problem to drive 50, 60 miles to the classroom for my learning in a heartbeat instead of having to MOUNT all these 'extentions' to my body. Cindy [Comment] [Permalink]

Re: What E-Learning 2.0 means To You

I didnt listen to the files, life is too short for podcasts and the like, unless you can live without music, (some can I guess) so I am guessing... I always read your stuff and feel kind of er...humble... but you say it fell flat, well look at slide five, Wittgenstein, Quine, van Fraassen, Hanson, Lakoff, Stalneker and Lewis. To the private sector????..maybe it is early to write off transactional distance, it may not be the best metaphor, but it is useful in looking at this particular situation, it isnt the wrong message but I suspect you are so far ahead that they will all have gone away and carried on regardless, clever fellow that Downes:) You can carry on regardless too, it will percolate slowly, but really slowly... if the e-learning industry is to listen, then maybe you need to think about how to bring all of us with you to where you're going. I have to do this all the time, I do teacher training for online learning, endless horrendous compromise, I have to start a long way before Moore, and Moore is ...huh?...what?...especially when I suggest it may mean there is sometimes more distance in face to face than online... [Comment] [Permalink]

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